Herman’s Hike Again

Counterclockwise This Time…

Today we want to hike up the switchbacks and along the ridge of the Willis Palms Loop in search of the trail that cuts through the palm grove, the trail we couldn’t find on November 14th.

We head out on the McCallum Trail toward Simone Pond and cut through to the wash of Moon Country. Purple rain clouds compete with white cumulus clouds for attention in the sky.

Three autumn rains send wildflower seeds spinning into confusion, bringing early blooms and blossoms and making Jeff and me crazy with trying to identify the flora that we see.

Cattle spinach, sandpaper, or burro bush?

Now you know… but we still confuse these 3 plants until you touch and smell. Cattle spinach has no smell and the leaves feel soft. Sandpaper is distinctly coarse. Burrobush smells lemony when you crush its yellow buds.

Here’s something new that we identify later. The caterpillar gives it away.

This caterpillar will turn into a monarch butterfly, we learn later.

We arrive at the trailhead to Herman’s Hike wondering how many switchbacks there are to the top. I start counting.

Moon Country Canyon lies below.

After almost a mile of 9 gradual switchbacks, we stand on a plateau of desert gravel where I take a picture of the Salton Sea. (It’s the bright white radioactive-looking horizontal line below the clouds.)

The snow-topped peak below to the west is Mt. San Jacinto hovering over Palm Springs.

To the “other” west is San Gorgonio, the highest peak in Southern California.

This pile of rocks adorns the highest point of Herman’s Hike. Last time we were here we stopped to rest, hydrate, and grab a snack. Today we just take pictures and head down toward Willis Palms identifying flowers along the way.

Now the 2 snow-capped mountain peaks can be seen in the same picture frame.

Meanwhile, we discover a plant we recognize…

And another we don’t…

Until I send a pic to our Preserve Manager, Ginny Short, who identifies it as alkali golden bush. We know this plant that blooms in October! But we have never seen a smaller version with prominent green leaves and wilting flowers that don’t look straw-like…

The erosive fractures on the hills remind me of stalagmites.

We descend along the trail ahead. And, just in case you were wondering, that IS Mt. San Jacinto in the background.

Down off Herman’s Hike we take the ridge trail toward Willis Palms. Desert trumpets blast through the sandy soil.

Below is the trail along the wash.

This rounded shrub is a popular plant around the Preserve. Its branches are brittle and woody with a fragrant resin. Small but radiant yellow flowers bloom on long stalks sticking up above the leafy stems in late winter or early spring. This year’s late autumn rains, however, have started early blooms.

We follow the ridge trail heading toward Willis Palms instead of the trailhead parking area. It’s narrow, steep, muddy, and rocky.

Finally we are inside the palm groves.

As we exit the grove we see a trail sign, the one we missed last time.

We exit into the wash and walk right into another new plant blooming. I’ve seen this plant before but always wondered why I could not see the shape of a wishbone in its leaves. Duh, it’s the stems that carry the shape!

Instead of heading back to the Willis Palms parking area and trailhead, we plow our way through a cutoff suggested by Harlan. (Please don’t do this on your own!)

Finally, we see Thousand Palms Canyon Road which we follow back to the Preserve.

Flowers, familiar bushes, and the Indio Hills escort us.

Whitewater Preserve

And The Wildlands Conservancy…

Just 20 minutes northwest of Palm Springs off I-10, lies 2,211 acres of dog-friendly, hiking trails open year round. Besides providing free access to public wilderness, The Wildlands Conservancy offers outdoor education and restores and protects critical habitat for:

desert bighorn sheep…

 en.m.wikipedia.org

least bell’s vireo…

  fws.gov

and southwestern willow flycatcher…

  ca.audubon.org

The Conservancy opened its first Preserve in 1995. Today, 15 Preserves later, TWC continues to save remarkable landscapes and open them free of charge for recreation and education. All of the Preserves and programs are maintained solely with private funding and donations. Connecting with nature… priceless (Preserve brochure)


Canyon view loop trail

From the Preserve trailhead, we follow the rock-lined path and cross the dry riverbed of the Whitewater Canyon River.

It’s a beautiful sunny day…

…and the blooming flora and foliage radiate against the clear blue sky…

I don’t know the names of these plants yet, but I will find out and identify them later, as in the nearish future. They are stunning.

We climb up several steep switchbacks before reaching the Pacific Crest Trail where the ridge levels off. (A good cardio workout!)

Along the ridge we spy cows grazing below and then walk through a plateau of their “plotchskis”, a mesa of manure.

Beaver-tailed cactus line the trail.

We reach a trail sign for the Canyon Loop Trail, leave the PCT and head back down.

The 3.5 mile Canyon View Loop Trail eventually reaches the road driving into the Preserve. In approximately 300 yards a trail marker leads back to the Visitor Center and off the road again. Today, however, the rest of the loop trail is still closed from the October 13th flash flood.

So, we walk back along the road enjoying these photo ops…

Ah… more flowers to identify later


Whitewater Preserve’s campground, park, Visitor Center, and Ranger Station are built on the foundation of the former Whitewater Trout Hatchery which closed in 2006. The Wildlands Conservancy acquired the 291-acre property through a partnership with Friends of the Desert Mountains and the Coachella Valley Mountains Conservancy.

A picnic area and shaded shelter are available for families and group outings. A wading pond helps relieve the hot summer heat. (Preserve brochure)

The nearby Mission Creek Preserve is also part of The Wildlands Conservancy. These 2 Preserves are outlined in blue on the map below.

The brown boundaries encompass the 154,000-acre Sand to Snow National Monument established on February 12, 2016 by President Obama. Sand to Snow rises from the desert floor of Whitewater and Mission Creek Preserves up into the snowy peaks of the San Gorgonio Wilderness that was named after the tallest peak in Southern California, 11,500-foot Mount San Gorgonio. This National Monument is a recreational wonderland providing opportunities to snowshoe, fly fish, bird-watch, and hike. (Preserve brochure)


Whitewater Preserve is open year round, free of charge. Guided hikes, stargazing, and bird walks are offered.

We will be back!

Joshua Tree National Park… After and Before…

After the Flashflood and Before the Partial Government Shutdown

The Little San Bernardino Mountains of JT overlook Thousand Palms Oasis. It’s a nice counterclockwise, day-drive loop from the south to west entrances.

It’s our day off and we want to look down over Thousand Palms Oasis from Keyes View.

Entering from Exit 168 off I-10, the south entrance, we see why this portion of JT was closed after the October flash flood. Dried mud still stains the park road and sandy remains are still piled up where the washes intersect the route.

From the  Cottonwood entrance we drive through the Colorado Desert on the way to the Mojave Desert.

The rocks really rock the washes blooming in green.

Piles of boulders stand alongside desert yucca.

Smoke trees and creosote line the road as we continue.

We arrive at the Pinto Basin and learn that a now extinct river once ran through here offering a cooler, wetter climate for a native culture to exist along its riverbank. (National Park plaque)

Between 1931 and 1935 self-taught archaeologists, Elizabeth and William Campbell, discovered many small campsites and chipped stone tools throughout the valley. These leaf-shaped points, scrapers, and choppers were different from other tools discovered in the area. Radiocarbon testing confirmed the existence of a vanished people from over 9000 years ago – – – The Pinto Culture. (National Park plaque)

As we continue along the Pinto Basin toward the Ocotillo Patch and Cholla Gardens, we notice a large desert plant with dark leaves and withered white flowers tinged with the color lavender. Since no cars are behind us, we stop and back up so I can get a picture. Later we learn that this plant is called Datura, or Jimson Weed, often found along roadsides and washes where the sand is constantly disturbed. (desertusa.com)

A perennial that loses its leaves in the winter, the flowers open at night and shrivel in the day. But don’t be fooled by this exquisite trumpet-shaped bloom!

  desertusa.com

Datura is extremely poisonous; all of its tissues contain chemical compounds known as alkaloids. The concentration of toxic levels varies from plant to plant. All parts of all datura plants are poisonous and can be fatal if ingested. Despite the grave risk, this night-blooming plant has been used since ancient times by spiritualists, holy men, medicine men, witches, and modern day recreational drug users as an hallucinogenic. (desertusa.com)

So… moving right along, we discover a patch along our drive dotted with ocotillos.

This thorny multi-stemmed shrub is not season dependent, but rain dependent. Following a sufficient rain, the ocotillo puts forth a cluster of leaves above each thorn with a flourish of green. The ocotillo may grow and drop leaves as many as 5 times per year. (National Park plaque)

We arrive at where we visited before, the amazing Cholla Gardens! Seriously, out of nowhere, cholla cacti are EVERYWHERE.

Soon after recovering from our “cholla overdose”, we turn west onto Park Boulevard and are greeted by our first joshua trees in the Mojave Desert.

This area is more heavily trafficked. We pull off across from Skull Rock and walk a less popular but awesome trail filled with spectacular photo ops!

Up close and personal with the desert mistletoe “sponging off” the mesquites…

Junipers…

And pencil chollas…

Beaver-tailed cactus…

Rocks… mesmerizing rocks…

Finally we head to Keyes View… our main destination:

Keyes View overlooks Thousand Palms Oasis Preserve and the San Andreas Fault. With binoculars, Jeff helps me locate the Preserve parking lot.


Circled in the photo below is the location of Keyes View as seen from Thousand Palms Oasis Preserve:


Leaving Keyes View through a forest of joshua trees…

This is our third visit to Joshua Tree NP and it never disappoints. Next time we want to explore the north entrance and hike Ryan’s Mountain.

Willis Palms and Herman’s Hike

We start from the Thousand Palms Oasis parking lot trailhead and cross the street to hike to Willis Palms alongside the Bee Mesa.

Indigos bloom.

Insect galls grow like pom-poms on creosote bushes.

Desert trumpets swell.

Pencil cholla spread.

I’m not sure what this is…

Or these leaves…

Dodder colorfully covers smoke trees like an ill-fitting toupee.

We cross the street again to reach the parking area and trailhead to Willis Palms. Broken glass warns visitors not to keep valuables in their car.

We head toward the palms looking for the trail that bisects the grove.

Cat’s claw… Notice the thorns pointing downward.

Willis Palms has survived 2 fires, one in the early 1980s and the other in 2010. As long as the crown of the “grass tree” survives, the palm is still alive and continues growing fronds that fold into skirts.

The black trunks, green and yellow fronds, and blue sky make a beautiful picture!

We never do find the trail through the grove, so we continue along the wash heading west, on a gorgeous, sunny, and warm day where blooming creosotes pose against the blue sky.

These sand-colored hills are remnants of the ancient seas that once washed the valley. If you dig deep enough, you will find seashells.

We hike through the wash and follow it as it curves to the north. We’ve taken this segment of the trail before, but from the opposite direction, so we know it leads up to a ridge that loops back to the trailhead. Trail signs are scarce as we wind (what feels like forever) through an enclosed valley searching for the trail leading up to the ridge.

At last…

We reach the top and have to make a decision. Do we head back to Willis Palms and retrace our steps? Or do we take Herman’s Hike back to Moon Country and Simone Pond and then proceed to where we started at the parking lot trailhead?

Jeff and I make an executive decision and turning around is no longer an option. We’ve reached the halfway point now, so Herman’s Hike it is and up we go.

Behind us you can see the valley wash we just hiked through.

Desert verbena crawl in the desert soil.

Almost to the top of Herman’s Hike, you can see San Jacinto and San Gorgonio Mountains.

On the top we rest beside a pile of rocks and eat a mix of cashews and raisins and drink water.

Heading down we encounter lots of blooming desert trumpets with very tiny yellow flowers. These striated curly green leaves with red veins eventually send out tall shoots.

We reach the switchbacks overlooking Moon Country Canyon.

Four and a half hours later we arrive back home, tired, sweaty, and thirsty. We have no idea how many miles we hiked or how hot it is temperature wise. We just know we had so much fun and enjoyed glorious views. The desert is really growing on us!

Moon Country

The Moon Country Trail is an extension of the McCallum Trail. It’s been a month since the October flash flood so Jeff and I decide to take the 4+ mile hike out and back to observe the water damage and examine the work of our repair efforts.

We head northwest from the Palm House Visitor Center along the boardwalk. White threads spread across the surface of the natural spring. These wisps are the tips of the palm roots.

The salt grass lays across the oasis channel, crushed by the weight of streaming water.

The new boardwalk hovers over the mud. An 80- foot section was built between 2 original sections. Now the boardwalk continues throughout the wetlands of the riparian forest.

The San Andreas Fault is so evident as we leave the palm grove and step out into the Colorado Desert. The hills inch up every year and the green arrowweed, creosote, cheese weed, and indigo thrive in abundance with a water source below. We are walking along the Mission Creek Strand of the Fault.

A plank guides hikers across a newly formed rivulet. To the left is the driveway to Chimney Ranch where the Powell family still owns homesteading property and living quarters. To the right, a boundary of rocks lines the trail to Simone Pond.

Beyond the line of rocks, notice the Little San Bernardino Mountains, the source of the flash flooding that wiped out most of the vegetation in the wash.

In the distance is an RV where David and Athena are staying. They are Preserve Hosts too, returning for their second winter.

David and Athena live about 3/4 mile west of the Palm House Visitor Center. The tree stumps are from cut-down Tamarisks, an invasive tree that sucks up precious water.

Tamarisk logs line the trail of the washed-out wash. Before drying out, the wash was a lake!

A phainopepla rests on a mesquite bush near the mound of red-orange desert mistletoe.

A creosote, confused that it’s springtime, starts blooming with its yellow flowers.

Meanwhile, the alkali goldenbush’s flowers fluff into seeds.

Desert holly… Jeff and I identify as many plants as we can.

On our hike through Moon Country, we stop and head to Vista Point.

Below is McCallum Grove shadowed by the Little San Bernardino Mountains.

And that’s the parking lot for Thousand Palms Oasis Preserve circled below.

We descend Vista Point and continue west along the ridge of the Moon Country Trail. The peak of San Gorgonio Mountain guides us.

As we descend the ridge we see the switchbacks of the Herman’s Hike Trail. And there’s a trail sign.

We know Moon Country is a loop so we continue west as the trail sign indicates.

After awhile, we realize we should have headed back when we came down the ridge. The sign should have read Moon Country Canyon instead. So, no problem… our goal now is to find the end of the box canyon.

With every turn, we think we are at the end only to find out we are wrong. The canyon hills are beautiful and entice us to continue.

Finally, we reach the end and turn around. I guess our 4-mile hike is becoming a 5+-mile hike.

As we connect with the McCallum Trail again, we loop around to the “jack rabbit house”. This pink building is an example of the minimum structure required to be built on homesteaded land.

Also, from this return loop from Moon Country, you get a good view to the entrance to Chimney Ranch, private property owned by the Powell family.

A Cottonwood Tree log…

And we’re back at Palm House. The fronds below blew down from yesterday’s wind storm.

Pushawalla Trail

Across the Street…

We cross Thousand Palms Canyon Road and head to the Pushawalla ridge.

At the top we look over at Thousand Palms Oasis Preserve. Squaw Hill is in the left foreground and evidence of the San Andreas Fault is marked by the notable greenery on the right and the more barren land on the left. Also note the hills pushing upward on the left, separating the Mission Creek Strand of the fault line from the Banning Strand.

We head east along the top of the ridge.

A barrel cactus stands alone in front of the Little San Bernardino Mountains of Joshua Tree National Park.

The Hidden Palms reveal themselves from above.

After a mile or so we descend from Pushawalla ridge and follow the trail to Pushawalla Palms. Circled below is a white “mark” on the crest of the Little San Bernardino Mountains. This is the location of Keyes View from Joshua Tree National Park.

The southwest side of Keyes View ridge drops nearly a mile in elevation into the Coachella Valley. The San Andreas Fault, stretching 700 miles from the Gulf of California to the Mendocino Coast north of San Francisco runs through the valley and can be seen below. (nps.org)

Yes, Keyes View looks down upon us, Thousand Palms Oasis Preserve. It is so much fun to point out that white spot on the ridge from our parking lot. Sometimes we tell visitors to give us a call when they arrive there so that we can come out and wave to them!

The trail circles around a plateau heading toward Pushawalla Palms.

And then… Seriously… this is the “trail”?

We scramble down the rocks and into a canyon and find the old rusted Model T car wreck.

The canyon leading to or out of Pushawalla Palms is commonly called Car Wreck Canyon. No one knows the story of how the automobile got there and if, indeed, it is a Model T.

We pass the car wreck and continue along a wash toward Pushawalla Palms.

We pass through the palm grove and ascend along a rise, before heading down again into a canyon wash.

Water is still trickling off the Little San Bernardino Mountains from the October 13th flash flood.

Below is a great picture of the palm tree roots. Notice how the straw-like tendrils reach toward the water source.

We pass a trail sign for Horseshoe Palms and continue walking through the canyon, looking for a sign directing us back to Pushawalla ridge.

But that doesn’t happen.

So, we retrace our steps and head back to the sign for Horseshoe Palms.

The palm fruit hanging from the fronds of the palm tree below, looks like a pair of earrings to me.

Once again we scramble rocks to climb out of the canyon and find the trail that takes us back toward the ridge of Pushawalla.

Instead of returning along the ridge, we opt for the lower trail along the wash. Unfortunately, we take a false trail and yet again scramble down more rocks where we find a couple of hikers breezing by on the real trail.

Fortunately, we hook up with the proper wash trail as we head back to the Preserve and I capture close-ups of barrel cactus.

Next time we hit this trail, Jeff and I will start in the wash and return on the ridge, just to find out where the actual wash trail begins!