Two More Stops… Kingman, Arizona

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We spend our last 2 nights in Arizona at the Blake Ranch RV Park and Horse Motel near Kingman, AZ, one right turn directly off I-40 West and about 60 miles away from the border to eastern CA. And yes, you read correctly… a horse motel!

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Below is a picture of the horse motel.

image blakeranchrv.com

According to the website, the horse motel has twelve 12’x12′ covered stalls with fresh well water and clean shavings provided upon arrival. For self-contained horse trailers and RVs, 30’x70′ pull-through sites are available adjacent to the horse’s area. Two 50 feet round pens are available on the premises to exercise horses kept in trailers. Bunkhouse cabins that sleep up to 4 people can be rented.

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And of course, the RV sites and horse motel areas are separate!

image blakeranchrv.com

We stay in site 23 on Willow Way.

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I walk around the premises the day after we arrive and capture the following desert settings:

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The best pictures of all are the ones of the Arizona sunset on the eve of our departure.

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About Kingman

Sitting along the eastern edge of the Mojave Desert, between a plateau and the lower Colorado River Valley, Kingman is spared the hot dry desert climate. Because of its higher elevation and its geographic location, summer temps rarely reach 100 degrees fahrenheit and winter temps may occassionally bring snowfall.

The city was founded in 1882 as part of the Arizona Territory. It was named after Lewis Kingman, a surveyor for the Atlantic-Pacific Railroad which ran through the area. Before receiving its name, however, Edward Beale left his mark on Kingman. An officer in the U.S. Navy and a topographical engineer, Beale’s orders were to build a federal wagon road along the 35th parallel. In 1857 he surveyed the area through Kingman and in 1859 he returned to supervise the construction of the road which is now part of Route 66 and I-40. An interesting footnote to this story is Beale’s secondary orders. While surveying for a future wagon road he was also to explore the feasability of using camels as pack animals in the desert. This so called Camel Corps never reached fruition due to the timing of the Civil War. (from en.m.wikipedia.org)

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