Car Trippin’… Temecula

 image Half the way there!

My daughter-in-law’s parents live in Temecula, California, which is another reason we chose Lake Elsinore for winter RV parking. Lake Elsinore is about half way between here and there and everywhere between Irvine and Temecula.


TEMUCULA

Incorporated as a city in 1989, Temecula is bordered by Murrieta to the north and the Pechanga Reservation of the Luiseno band to the south. Interpretations of the name include: the place of the sun, the sun that shines through the mist, and where the sun breaks through the mist. In 1798  and 1820, Spanish missionaries established missions in this area which were dispersed into ranchos in the 1840s when the Mexicans acquired the land. As American settlers moved in, the indigenous tribes were evicted from their land until the United States government granted 4,000 acres to the Pechanga tribe. Meanwhile, wealthy families bought land from the existing ranchos and created ranchos of their own. In the 1890s the Temecula area operated granite stone quarries. By the turn of the century, Temecula was a major shipping point for cattle and grain due to the extension of the Santa Fe Railroad through the San Bernardino Valley.  Common to the history of southern CA, white settlers began buying tracts of land and creating ranches to raise cattle and grow crops. In 1904 Walter L. Vail established the Vail Ranch. By 1947 the Ranch contained over 87,500 acres and supported the economy of the Temecula Valley through the mid-1960s. The Kaiser Aetna partnership eventually purchased the Vail Ranch and after adding 10,000 more acres the area became known as Rancho California. The I-15 corridor, passing through Rancho, was completed in the early 1980s and with the subdivision land boom, Temecula became the official name of the newly incorporated city in December of 1989. (en.m.wikipedia.org)


Temecula is wine country! Did you know that Southern California was the major wine producer of the state during the 1800s? Well, now you do! In the late 1960s grape growing and winemaking began a revival in the Temecula Valley. The first wines were produced by the Brookside Winery in Cucamonga, but in 1974, with the opening of the Calloway Winery, winemaking crushed the Valley. (temeculawines.org)

image sandiegouniontribune.com

Today, more than 30-some family owned wineries dot the rolling hills.

image temeculawines.org

I was introduced to Temecula Wine Country in December 2013 by Amanda’s parents. Tim and Sue O’Connell are the most gracious hosts and tour guides!

image temeculawines.org

Amanda and John were married at Lorimar Winery in May of 2014. The following photos are not from their wedding, but you get the picture, groan…

image temeculawines.org

image myvalleynews.com

image lorimarwinery.com


We spent Christmas evening in Temecula, eating, drinking, singing, laughing, and playing games with Tim, Sue, Brittany, Amanda, and John.


A few months later, Jeff and I spent a Saturday afternoon in Old Town Temecula. Old Town is a bustling collection of historic buildings from the 1890s featuring restaurants, boutiques, antique stores, hotels, and street re-enactments of the Old West. (en.m.wikipedia.org)

image establishedcalifornia.com

image oldtowntemecula.org

It originally dates back to 1882 when the railroad ran through the Valley. (oldtowntemecula.com)

Saturday mornings are extra special because the Promenade becomes an open-air farmers’ market filled with organic produce, fresh seafood, local honey, food, samples, baked goods, flowers, and crafts!

image youtube.com

image prweb.com

image seriouseats.com

The highlight of our trip to Temecula’s Farmers’ Market was the food we ate that day. The Salvadoran pupusas were delicious! A pupusa is a thick corn tortilla typically filled with a blend of cheese, cooked and seasoned ground pork, and refried beans, or any combination of such goodness. It is served with a side of curdito, a lightly fermented cabbage slaw with red chiles and vinegar. (en.m.wikipedia.org)

image newyork.seriouseats.com

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