Heading West Part 1

Denver, CO to Springer, NM… November 8th

Interstate 25

IMG_8456

IMG_8458

IMG_8459

IMG_8461

It really feels good to be back on the road again. Even with a dirty windshield, the view from a motorhome never disappoints. I have no trouble switching into my photo-journalist role.

We spend the first night just off the Interstate at the Old Santa Fe Trail RV Park in Springer, NM.

IMG_8465

IMG_8466

IMG_8476

IMG_8477


Springer, NM to Magdalena, NM… November 9th

Back on I-25 we pass through the outskirts of Santa Fe.

IMG_8479

IMG_8481

In Socorro, we take Route 60 West to Magdalena…

IMG_8489

…where we spend the night at the Western Motel and RV Park.

IMG_8490

IMG_8496

IMG_8491

IMG_8506

According to en.m.wikipedia.org, Magdalena is a small ranching community that grew up in 1884. The mining boom of 1913 changed the status of Magdalena from Village into Incorporated Town. In 2012 the U.S. Census Bureau recorded 926 people living here.

IMG_8497

IMG_8498

IMG_8504

It is also known as “Trails End” for the 1885 railroad spur line that ran 26 miles from Socorro to Magdalena. Cowboys drove herds of cattle and sheep into town via the Old Magdalena Trail. The original stockyards are still intact.

The Public Library and Boxcar Museum are housed in the old railroad depot.

IMG_8501

IMG_8502

IMG_8505

As I snoop around taking pictures, I meet 3 local gentlemen and a dog who jumped out of the backseat of the white truck above. The owner of the dog verifies the Wikipedia information about the stockyard driveway. Between 1885 through 1916, cowboys from the west drove thousands of cattle and sheep to Magdalena to board the train. Besides these grazers, timber, wool, and ore were also transported. In 1971 the trains stopped running. 

The Santa Fe boxcar above is being gutted for remodeling as an addition to the Boxcar Museum. I walk up to the man working on this project. As we talk we became instant friends. First he shows me the gutted boxcar. It reminds me of a blank canvas for an RV or Tiny House. And being next to the library, I recall the children’s book series, The Boxcar Children. He proceeds to tell me how he settled in Magdalena from Southern California and now lives off the grid on land purchased in the surrounding hills.

A younger man, overhearing our conversation, joins us to share how he also lives off the grid. He and his wife purchased some land up in the hills. Solar panels, a well, and I don’t know what their toilet situation is… Property tax is $1 a year! The only drawback is the wear and tear on the truck going to and fro from their homestead. 


60 West into Arizona… November 10th

IMG_8507

The desert dominates the landscape as we continue due West on 60. Within 24 miles we see large objects spread across the desert.

IMG_8511

IMG_8512

These objects are the immense dishes of the Very Large Array (VLA) spread across more than a hundred square miles of desert. They gather invisible light— radio waves— naturally emitted in space. The VLA is the most famous and powerful telescope of its kind. Precious information from space travels for billions of years to reach the Array. We learn about the birth of stars, the growth of galaxies, the power of black holes, and clouds of molecules that may be the building blocks of life. (Travel Brochure)

IMG_8514

IMG_8516

Next time we’ll stop and visit…

After another 10 minutes, we approach the Cibola National Forest.

IMG_8523

IMG_8525

IMG_8526

IMG_8530

IMG_8533

By 9:50 AM we enter Pie Town, NM.

IMG_8536

IMG_8538

IMG_8540

IMG_8541

Unfortunately, we arrive too early to buy a pie!

IMG_8542

Pie Town, NM is named for a bakery making dried-apple pies. Clyde Norman established the town in the early 1920s. On the 2nd Saturday of each September, the annual “Pie Festival” takes place. (newmexico.org)

According to en.m.wikipedia.org, as of the 2010 census, Pie Town had a population of 186.

IMG_8543

So we continue on 60 West toward Globe, AZ, crossing the border some 30 minutes later.

IMG_8546

 

One thought on “Heading West Part 1

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s