“Where Can I Go To See The Wildflowers?”

That is the Question…

… most asked by the constant stream of visitors coming and going on the Preserve.

Since most folks have never been here before and will probably never return, we recommend the signature trail to Simone Pond and back with a short detour to Vista Point before heading back.

However, less crowded and just as aesthetically appealing hikes are across the street. Both the Pushawalla Ridge and Wash Trails are lined with blooms and planted bouquets of color.

Today, however, Jeff and I explore the trail alongside Bee Mesa, parallel to Thousand Palms Canyon Road.

WOW!

Desert Rock-Pea…

Jeff and I think this is some kind of Sun Cup…

Nipple Cactus…

Gilia…

Skeleton…

White Phacelia…

Lavender…

Desert Dandelions… pure yellow

Five-Spots… unopened they look like rose buds

Desert Trumpet…

California Evening Primrose… a tall sparse plant with yellow flowers

A Painted Lady Butterfly resting on Pincushion…

The trail cuts through the super bloom field of yellows, purples, and whites… eye candy!

Desert Rock Daisies, White Phacelia, and Purple Phacelia…

A close up of White Phacelia…

Heartleaf Primrose…

More Gilia…

Purple Mat… a belly plant because you have to lie on your belly to get a good pic!

Broadleaf Gilia… beautiful, but sticky and stinky

Yellow Plumes


On our way back we run into our Preserve Manager, Ginny. She’s on a hillside pulling these invasive weeds…

en.m.wikipedia.org

Mediterranean Needle Grass or stipa capensis is native to the Persian Gulf and is an annual grass now found in the Coachella Valley of the Sonoran Desert. It is now becoming so widespread in the Palm Springs area that it is becoming a serious fire hazard to the California desert ecosystems. The sharp florets of the plant can injure animals and may attach to their fur as a dispersal mechanism, thus decreasing the abundance of native wildflowers. (cal-ipc.org)

So we start pulling these suckers and stashing them into trash bags which we carry out to the Pushawalla parking area for Ginny who will pick them up in her truck.

Upon returning to our RV we discover these sharp needles stuck in our shirts, shorts, socks, and shoes. So we carefully remove each one and properly throw them away instead of allowing them to disperse and propagate.

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