Starry Starry Morning…

Minus Tide on Battle Rock Beach: A Photo Exhibition


The stars of the show: A series


a collection of co-stars: collages with anemones


So many starfish… so amazing


Seize the Size


mosaics on the rocks


I spy Starfish…


Anemones, barnacles, and snails… sigh


Snail Crossing


She sees Seagulls on the seashore


Swept ashore: a still life of starfish, snails, and chiton


Blowing beautiful bubbles on the beach


I’ve looked at clouds…

And fog…

from all sides…

Now…


Moseying through the mouth of Hubbard Creek

REACHING OUT TO THE ROCK

The ides of tides


REVELATIONS: REVEALING UNREVEALED ROCKS

A visceral victim: 2 Vultures and A washed-up sea lion


4 swept up starfish sitting in the sun: souvenirs


A Rainbow rings the sun: our walk is done

More Beach Bumming

My Favorite Moments

Battle Rock Beach June 22nd

Ripples of sand…

Tidal pools…

Sea anemones…

On the rocks…

Redfish Rocks…

Hubbard Creek changes channels to the sea…

Washed up…

Black Oyster Catchers…

Rooted in the sand…


Paradise point/Agate Beach June 26th… HAppy birthday, dad. You would have been 92 Years old. ❤

It’s a w-i-n-d-y day!

This colorful little beetle blows away after I take its picture…

As we continue walking south along the beach our backs are pelted by the tiny pebbles carried by the wind. Ouch! The only bums bumming along the shore are us…


Battle Rock beach again July 7th

Bundles of bull kelp…

Navigating the waves…

Notice the sailboat in the photo above and Redfish Rocks in the photo below.

And now I capture them both in the same photo…

Pecking order… Fresh crab…

Snail shells and other stuff stuck on sea rocks…

Hubbard Creek and Humbug Mountain…

Serious sand sculpting …

Blue skies, evergreens, sandy cliffs, and pink flowers…


Tseriadun State Park/Agate Beach July 10th

Blackberries…

Yummily tart to the taste…

Live crab…

Tidal pools…

A starfish mosaic created by the wind…

Port Orford Heads…

“Mussel Beach”…

Splish splash…

Agate hunters…

‘Neath the Rock

Battle Rock Beach 2018

We walk the mile or so to Battle Rock Wayside Park along Highway 101, called Oregon Street here in Port Orford.

I find flowers along the way that capture my fancy.

The petals of these bright pink flowers resemble crepe paper.

These blooms look like salal, but they are not.

Purple violet-like flowers and pink-tinged daisies make their home in a large sawed-off wooden barrel.


We have no agenda except to walk, enjoy, and observe the changing seascape.

As we head toward Hubbard Creek’s spillage into the ocean, we meet 2 librarians from Utah. They carry thick rods with a scoop on the end. I assume they are clamming. Curious, I approach them to learn more. No, they aren’t clamming… just scooping up treasures from the beach without bending over.

We trade stories and share our delight for Port Orford.

Meanwhile, Jeff and I scoop up our own treasures that we collect in our bulging pockets.

As we return to Battle Rock we take advantage of the low tide to explore the cave-like crevices at the foot of the rock and to walk through the natural tunnel to the other side of the beach.

Do you recognize the mountain in the distance, the tallest one on the Oregon Coast? If you said Humbug, you are right!

Do you see the colony of white in the middle of the right side of the rock above? Does that make sense? Below is a close-up of these barnacles, mussels, and shells attached to the rocks.

Here’s the tunnel to the other side…

So, we walk through.

We arrive at the other side of Battle Rock to a mini-beach that ends at a bluff. Beyond it is the beach at the dock.

We collect some sea glass among the rocks.

Here’s a pic of the other side of Battle Rock.

And the view through the tunnel with Humbug towering in the distance…

As we return and head back, I discover the path the 4-wheel-drive vehicles take to access the beach.

The piles of driftwood still amaze me.

And a fishing boat reminds me of Port Orford’s natural resources.

As we make our way up the hill toward the Wayside parking lot, I can’t help myself. I just have to take pics of these colorful blooms of spring.

Back at the RV we unload our pockets and display our newest collection of beach treasures.

Stop and See the Seaweed

Battle Rock Beach

We rise and shine and walk to Battle Rock Beach with a goal in mind… to head south for a mile, past the familiar shoreline of rocks, nooks, and crannies to Hubbard Creek and back again. I promise myself not to take any pictures until we reach our destination and turn around. I keep my word.

We arrive to where the creek pushes away the sand and ripples into the sea and the picture-taking commences.

Shore birds feast on tiny sea critters the battering waves uncover from beneath the sand.

In front of me, looking west…

Behind me, looking north toward Battle Rock and the Port of Port Orford…

We leisurely walk back, looking down, looking beyond, and stopping to explore.


Bright green seaweed hugs this rock like a post-it-note…

A large rock tattooed with embedded stones, shells, and fossils…

Pools of water trapped inside white rocks… lying underneath soggy seaweed toupees…

The rocky shore…

Wet rocks glistening in the sun… (Jeff thinks the largest rock in the middle looks like an alien. And no, no agates today on this beach…)

A dead crab washed up and stuck between some rocks at low tide…

A bad hair day…

A rock stack, almost up close and personal…

A tidal pool with 2 large sand borers… Can you spot them below? They look like mole crabs.

Can you see them now?

Seaweed trapped in a tidal pool…

Rocks you can walk out on and take some pics from…

As the tide slowly comes in, we walk closer to the shore and discover a washed up starfish surrounded by pieces of driftwood sculpted smooth by the waves.

As the waves ebb and flow, they leave a curvy outline of seaweed and crab pieces in the sand highlighted by claws and body shells picked over by the shore birds. It’s unusual to see a whole crab.

As we approach Battle Rock I focus on capturing different views of the beach beyond, taken from the rocky shore.

Ch-Ch-Ch-Chia Pet…

Port Orford Heads and the Dock in the distance…

Strange jelly-like creatures appear closer to Battle Rock… From afar they look like scattered bird feathers until we examine them up close.

At first we think these oval-shaped webs have something to do with mussels that are similarly shaped. Do bivalves shed?

A little online researching identifies these jelly-like “skins” as Velella velella. They are small predatory clusters of identical cells drifting on the surface of the open ocean. These chondrophores or porpitids look like a single organism but are actually a colony of specialized individual animals that perform unique tasks and cannot survive outside the group.

Velella are transparent sail-shaped membranes with a texture like cellophane.  They are filled with gas and prey upon micro-plankton. (en.m.wikipedia.org)

Apparently it is not unusual to see a large collection of these sea creatures washed up onto the beach when changing winds and currents propel them ashore instead of pushing them out into the ocean.

More common names for Velella include sea raft, by-the-wind sailor, purple sail, and little sail. (en.m.wikipedia.org)

While I take pictures, Jeff and I also search for unusual rocks and seashells, always hoping to find an agate or two.

We don’t uncover any agates, but we do find lots of spiral-like seashells and rocks for Jeff’s “planter”.

(He has found 3 seeds in his marijuana stash and wants to plant them to see if they will grow. So…. He purchased this acrylic vase at the Dollar Store in Brookings, Oregon when we traveled the 55 miles south to grocery shop at Fred Meyer which is owned by Kroger, the familiar chain of our hometown, Cincinnati.)

I explain to him that a bed of rocks and lots of dirt in a large container are not the best way to plant tiny seeds. I suggest he buy a small clay pot so the seeds can take root first and later transplant the growing plant. Meanwhile, his rock collection grows. He just needs to find a small clay pot to set inside the vase and atop the rocks to see if the seeds will grow. (Or we can root from an avocado or sweet potato…)


She sees seaweed and seashells by the seashore… 

Can you repeat this 3x fast?

Battle Rock Beach

Port Orford 2018

We start today with a walk down to Battle Rock Beach, about a mile from Camp Blanco RV Park.

The tide is receding. Notice the high tide water mark on the rock below.

Truthfully, I don’t even know if that is a water line. All I do know is that I can see a starfish clinging to the side of a rock, but the encroaching waves prevent me from getting close enough to take a proper picture. And that’s the only starfish I spy along our beautiful beach walk. So, perhaps the tide is flowing in again.

But it doesn’t matter… The rocky shoreline is the real star of the show.

Rocks are a powerful metaphor lending meaning to life.

Strong, but fragile… Solid but broken… Rough but smooth… Connected but abandoned… Powerfully intimidating but gently reassuring… Gigantic but tiny… Dull but colorful… Rare but ordinary… Prized but discarded…

Rocks speak to my spirit and tell me extraordinary tales of adventure, endurance, patience, suffering and preciousness.

As I grow older and turn back the pages of my life’s story, I have similar tales to share. Once I was the king of my mountain until one day I was pushed off balance and found myself floating in mid air, scared, shocked, and out of control. Then a strange thing happened. I grew a pair… of wings… and I surprised myself. I flew! 

As we walk Battle Rock Beach, Jeff and I become mesmerized into our own worlds.

Jeff finds a good-sized agate, some wave-smoothed pieces of driftwood, and a marbled rock of black and white that called his name.

I bury myself in the sand and take pictures instead.

A still life arranged by nature…

A washed up jellyfish…

A large mussel shell…

The remains of tiny crab-like crustaceans…

A loooooooooooong bull kelp… (from left to right)

Bull kelp is the fastest growing seaweed and can grow up to 20 feet long in one season. After I take my pictures, Jeff picks the kelp up and tries to whip me.

Meanwhile, as I escape the bull kelp whipping, I notice this colorful boulder planted in the sand.

Looking toward the eastern bank of the shoreline, green rocks cascade onto the beach.

I love this color green!

The only people we see on the beach have dogs. Each dog runs up to us for some attention and love pats. Two such dogs run through the low tide waters and romp among the rocks.

Then, a single man strides toward us… He is blowing bubbles, colorful bubbles along the beach! As he passes I give him a shout out and he tells me how the bubbles form a vortex among the rock stacks.

As Jeff and I leave the beach and meander up the pathway towards the Visitor Center, spring blooms capture my attention.

Outside the Visitor Center driftwood benches beckon sightseers.

As I pop in to say hello, Jeff meets a professional fisher woman and her visiting sister.

We leave the parking area and a single orange California poppy waves goodbye to me.

Seeing Stars

 Fish…

Jeff and I walk to Battle Rock Beach today. Someone has built a fort out of driftwood and I respectfully and delightfully memorialize the efforts.

The tide is out and oh, what a wonderland of ocean life we discover! These rocks tell stories.

And expose all sorts of ocean life clinging onto them or in the surrounding tidal pools!

These rocks look like pieces of wood, but they have only been smoothed by years of ocean waves…

Low tide also washes up…

And these little mole crabs or sand crabs, scurrying above and below the sand…

Walking around Port Orford also means encountering local peeps and their pups. On our way to Battle Rock we meet Fawn, a 12-week-old pup and her peep of no name. Later, on the beach, we recognize Fawn. I endear myself to her peep of no name and we share our love of Port Orford. She, the peep of no name, captures a teeny tiny crab among this rock of shells and crevices.

And I take a picture of this teeny tiny crab crawling up her arm.

What a glorious day of exciting new discoveries!