Shepperd’s Dell

image “In 1915 George Shepperd donated 11 acres and a waterfall to the public as a memorial to his wife. Used as his family’s place of worship, this beautiful state park is known as Shepperd’s Dell.” 

(from plaque at scenic view)

A short trail winds down to this 2-tier waterfall that is right off the highway.

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The waterfall peeks through the foliage on the way down, offering glimpses at different angles and reflecting the soft light of the setting sun.

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And then, right before I reach the falls, I look up and see another landmark, the Shepperd’s Dell bridge built in 1914.

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The air feels cool as I walk out to the falls. I am close enough to dip my toes in

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or jump over the edge!

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No stopped traffic. No hunting for a place to park. No crowds in the way…

What a peaceful way to end a truly beautiful day.

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Bridal Veil Falls

image And an Interpretive Trail

A bridge on the Columbia River Highway passes right over the falls. Two cascades along sharp rock faces resemble a flowing veil. A winding footpath and a bridge across a creek lead to the viewing area.

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Bridal Veil is also the name of a town with its own post office. It’s no wonder that many couples ship their wedding invitations here for the postmark. (en.m.wikipedia.org)


Native cultures have called the Gorge home for over 10,000 years. The Columbia River transported people through the mountains

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connecting coastal and plateau tribes for extensive trading in this area each summer.

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Lewis and Clark opened these western waters to settlers who started arriving in the mid 1800s. Gradually riverboats replaced canoes, roads replaced trails, and rails replaced covered wagons. (plaque on trail)

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As we return to the car, what looks like an apple falls off a tree in front of us.

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On closer inspection, I discover it’s a little pear, perfectly shaped but not ripe enough to eat.

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Across the highway is a B&B, part of the original Bridal Veil Lodge built in 1926, as a hotel, restaurant, and auto camp with cabins for tired travelers.

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5 Mountains

image 5 Incredible Views

 Exhausted from spending Monday in a car with 2 dogs for 8 hours, we sleep in today and get smart. We head out on the Columbia River Highway in the late afternoon and leave the dogs behind in an air-conditioned RV. We never expected the northwest to be so hot… mid 90s!

First stop… Larch Mountain, 14 miles one way, just off Highway 30.

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Here we are. Ready? Let’s go to the Sherrard Viewpoint.

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We made it! Now, let’s view those mountains.


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Well, you get a feeling of being here, I hope…

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The Historic Columbia River Highway

image Route 30 in the Gorge

Sunday we arrive in Corbett, Oregon at Crown Point RV Park situated on the historic and scenic Highway 30.

Monday we have a 7:00 AM appointment for a tire alignment on the RV at Northside Ford in Portland.

image yelp.com

Remember our tire tread problems we discovered in Diamond Lake, where we had to replace the 2 front tires? Luckily we find a Ford dealer who can accommodate the RV. Even luckier is the fact that there is plenty to keep us busy for 8 hours in a car with 2 dogs.

After scoping out downtown Portland, we head back to Highway 30 to commune with nature and, unfortunately, all the other sightseers. 😩

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First stop… The scenic view from Chanticleer Point

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on land donated by the Portland Women’s Forum in 1960 for the purpose of preserving the natural beauty of the Columbia River Gorge.

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As people began migrating west on the rugged Oregon Trail in 1843, a man with vision saw the need for a road parallel to the Columbia River. That man was an eccentric and wealthy railroad attorney named Sam Hill. In 1913 he proposed the building of a scenic highway while seated in the Chanticleer Inn on this very same beautiful bluff. (The inn, constructed in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1931, offered elegant accommodations to tired travelers at the dawn of the automobile age.)

image plaque at scenic view

The next month, construction surveying began and by the 1920s this roadway where “tired men and women… may enjoy the wild beauty of nature’s art gallery and recreate themselves”

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was called king of roads. (plaque at state scenic view)


Next up… Vista House at Crown Point

Vista House, constructed in 1916, was designed to be a “comfort station” for motorists traveling the new 75 mile Columbia River Highway through the gorge linking Portland in the west to the Dalles in the east. (I took this picture on a late afternoon visit when the hoard of other tourists were gone.)

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It sits atop Crown Point, a steep and rocky bank towering 693 feet above the Columbia River.

image commons.wikimedia.org

Here are pictures I took from I-84 below

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and across I-84 from Rooster Rock State Park.

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Architect Edward M. Lazarus turned the idea of a “pit stop” into a viewing deck, a space to comfortably stretch legs, and of course a place to quench thirsts and use a restroom. Today the lower level includes an espresso bar, a gift shop, and interpretive displays. (Oregon State Parks brochure)

As in the past, Vista House still invites every passerby to stop, refresh, and take in the views.

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Then a waterfall… Latourell Falls, named after the tiny town nearby

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In 1929 Guy and Geraldine Talbot donated this land surrounding the falls to the State of Oregon for all to enjoy. (plaque at scenic view)

I walk down a narrow path beside towering cliffs of basalt to get a closer view.

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The way the sun is hitting the falls makes for a psychedelic photo op!

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Finally… A traffic jam on the highway

So we turn around and head down to I-84 and a rest area to find out when the RV will be available.