Beyond Remote

image Heading west to the coast…

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Bridge, Oregon is the next little community roughly 8 miles away.

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The town’s history began in 1870 as a post office with the name, Enchanted Prairie. In 1883 the new postmaster, who lived 2 miles west, changed both the location and name of the post office to Angora.  The post office retained its name but relocated twice more to the homes of each new postmaster. In 1894 the Bridge post office was established and named for the bridge crossing the Middle Fork Coquille River. The post office remained open until 1945.

in the meantime, Bridge became a stagecoach stop where horses were exchanged. By 1915 the town had a creamery, sawmill, gristmill, school, and a church. In 1940 the population totaled 39.  The church, founded in 1900, still exists today as the Bridge Community Church. (en.m.wikipedia.org)
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Myrtle Point is another 9 miles west of Bridge. It’s a small city of less than 3,000 but it is our nearest grocery store, hardware store, dentist, and hair salon. It is 15 miles from the Pacific Ocean. (en.m.wikipedia.org)

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Coquille is the next stop along Highway 42, 9 miles from Myrtle Point.

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Named after the River which borders this small city and the tribe of Native Americans who first settled here, Coquille’s economic base is the timber industry. (en.m.wikipedia.org)

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Coos Bay is a city about 18 miles north of Coquille along Highway 101, where the Coos River enters the bay on the Pacific Ocean. Bordering North Bend, the two cities are often referred to as the Bay Area and, with a combined population of around 16,000, Coos Bay-North Bend is the largest city on the Oregon coast. The bay itself, is an S-shaped inlet 10 miles long and 2 miles wide.

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Thousands of years ago members of the Coos, Coquille, Siuslaw, and Umpqua tribes lived here to hunt, fish, and gather. In 1579 Sir Francis Drake supposedly came here seeking shelter with his ship, the Golden Hinde.

The earliest settlement of European Americans, called Camp Castaway, was established in January of 1852 by the survivors of the shipwrecked schooner, Captain Lincoln, en route from San Francisco. (en.m.wikipedia.org)

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So, you get a better picture now of where we are staying through mid-September. Isolated, yes, but rustic, rural, and beautiful as well. We still have lots to discover and learn. For example, we have yet to explore one of the roads off of Highway 42. And some weekend we plan on traveling up the mountain side when no logging trucks come barreling out of the forests, and all we have to avoid are the hunters.

The only downside for me is that there is nowhere nearby where I can take my 5 mile walks. I walked to the covered bridge and back on Highway 42 once, praying I wouldn’t become roadkill each time a logging truck sped by me. The worrying defeated the purpose of my exercise. So, I am now resigned to taking it easy for the next few months and embracing the beauty and challenges of my remote RV lifestyle, pun intended!

Remotely Removed…

image from suburbia, sub-divisions and cities

If you “google” Remote, Oregon you will find out that it is an unincorporated community in Coos County where Sandy Creek merges with the Middle Fork Coquille River.

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Early pioneers appropriately named the location for its distance from other settlements. (en.m.wikipedia.org)

Nestled in a valley of the Coast Range, Remote is situated along Highway 42, a major east-west route linking the southern Oregon Coast to Interstate 5 near Roseburg. Route 42 used to run through the center of town until the realignment of the highway.

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The empty remains of the General Store/Post Office/Gas Station attest to Remote’s vestige of commerce in the past. (scod.com)

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A covered bridge originally carried Highway 42 across the creek. In 1979 it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Sandy Creek Wayside is a rest stop area 2 miles west of Remote Outpost RV Park and Cabins offering a footbridge, restrooms, information, and picnic tables. (en.m.wikipedia.org)

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GETTING TO REMOTE

Exit Interstate 5, just south of Roseburg

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toward Winston, Oregon and continue traveling southwest on Highway 42 for another 25 miles through Tenmile and Camas Valley. Remote is approximately 17 miles beyond Camus Valley.

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Winston is a 2.65 square mile city in Douglas County, 9 miles from Roseburg and 80 miles south of Eugene, Oregon.

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It is home to Wildlife Safari, a 600-acre park created in 1973 by Frank Hart, a frequent visitor to Africa. Over 600 animals, including bears, capybaras, South African cheetahs, African elephants, giraffes, hippopotamuses, lions, and ostriches wander freely on the available grasslands.

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Guests can drive through the 4.5 mile looping road and walk through a display of the park’s smaller animals in the Australian Walkabout exhibit. Wildlife Safari is a nonprofit organization overseen by the Safari Game Research Foundation. (en.m.wikipedia.org)

A bronze cheetah greets visitors in the center of town.

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Tenmile, another unincorporated community, lies about 9 miles west of Winston along Highway 42. The spot was named by an early settler who used to drive his cattle here from Happy Valley  which was about 10 miles away. (en.m.wikipedia.org)

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Camas Valley is the next unincorporated community 8 miles further west.

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It is named after the camassia plant which thrives in the moist meadows of the valley.

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A genus of plants in the asparagus family, camassia is also known as camas, quamash, Indian hyacinth, camash, and wild hyacinth. The quamash was an important food source for Native Americans. In autumn the plants were gathered. Once the flowers wilted, the bulbs could then be boiled, pit-roasted, or dried. Roasted quamash bulbs looked and tasted like baked sweet potatoes, only sweeter.

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Dried bulbs could be pounded into flour. Camas bulbs helped members of the Lewis and Clark Expedition to survive.


Next stop, Remote and Remote Outpost RV Park and Cabins…

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