The Wharf and Chinatown

image Places You Gotta See

Fisherman’s Wharf is a promenade of family entertainment and attractions but we just want to view fishermen at work and enjoy lunch.

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Alcatraz Island looms in the distance only accessible by daily cruises.

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The USS Pampanito is now a National Historic Landmark museum ship at Fisherman’s Wharf’s San Francisco Maritime National Park Association.

She completed 6 war patrols from 1944-1945 and later served as a Naval Reserve Training ship from 1960-1971. (baycityguide.com)

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This portal looks cool and must be historic.

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Behind Pier 39 fishing vessels are docked.

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We walk up and down the street of generations of family-owned restaurants

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before choosing to eat lunch at Nick’s Lighthouse.

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I order a fresh Dungeness Crab salad… Delicious! Jeff orders an oyster po-boy platter and wonders why he didn’t opt for some Dungeness Crab… Poor boy!

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This is a picture of the dock behind the restaurant.

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After lunch I take a picture of one of the vintage streetcars that run a total of 5 miles on the F-line. (baycityguide.com)

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And finally, in case you doubted where we are…

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No tour of San Francisco is complete without seeing Chinatown by passing through the Pagoda Gates on Grant Avenue.

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San Francisco’s first Chinese immigrants settled here in the 1850s and today over 10,000 Chinese residents live here. (baycityguide.com)

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Before heading back to the RV and the dogs, we drive through the streets lined with the Victorian “Painted Ladies”.

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See that small black car parked behind the signs? No, that’s not us. And no, we did not see the house from the film Mrs. Doubtfire or the TV show Full House. Are we disappointed? Not at all. In a day we sampled most all of the flavors of San Francisco from north to south and east to west.

The Streets of San Francisco

image Sightseeing

First stop… Twin Peaks

Rising some 925 feet, these 2 hills are nearly in the geographical center of San Francisco’s 49 square miles. (baycityguide.com)

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Views beyond the city include the Golden Gate Bridge

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and East Bay.

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The birthplace of the counter culture, the Haight Ashbury community is still creative and diverse. The inspiration of the 1960s lives on today.

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Lombard Street is the crookedest street in the world with 8 sharp turns on a 40-degree slope. The switchbacks were built in the 1920s to handle traffic descending the steep incline. (baycityguide.com)

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After traveling down the iconic street we park our car, second from the partial car on the left.

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And walk up a very steep street to capture the famous view.

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What goes up must come down.

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Going down is not as easy as it looks!


We drive around in search of a cable car.

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The cable car was introduced on August 2, 1873 by wire-cable manufacturer, Andrew Hallidie, who witnessed an accident in which a horse-drawn carriage rolled backward on a steep incline, dragging the horses behind it.

The advent of the cable car promoted the possibility of building on San Francisco’s steep hills. Until the earthquake of 1906 and the fires that destroyed the system, cable cars were the primary mode of transportation. Following the earthquake, a municipal railway replaced most cable car lines. (baycityguide.com)

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San Francisco

image First Impressions

Today is a longer haul than usual since we began traveling down the coast of Oregon and into northern CA and stopping for 3 night stays. It’s 294 miles from Trinidad to San Francisco.

We are still on Highway 101 but the landscape starts changing. Redwoods are replaced by these cool specimens.

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I do believe these are vineyards. Napa Valley is to the east somewhere.

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We’ve never been here before! Yep, it all checks out… Highway 101 and San Francisco on the same sign.

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And in the distance is the Golden Gate Bridge

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which turns out to really be red.

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City traffic

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and row-houses

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and trees bent by Pacific Ocean winds…

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We arrive at the San Francisco RV Resort in Pacifica, CA. Unfortunately no one could park an RV along the cliffs of the Pacific Ocean because of erosion.

That’s our RV, the third one from the right, facing the camera.

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It’s a parking environment here but amenities include a pool, hot tub, play yard for kids, laundry, and shopping within walking distance.

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And you never know who is going to pull in!

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For $94 dollars a night, which I have been told is a bargain in San Francisco, but our most expensive nightly stay ever, the views of the ocean are worth it.

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